Tax Loss Harvesting: Don’t Miss Out on the Opportunity

Tax Loss Harvesting: Don’t Miss Out on the Opportunity

NOBODY LIKES TO SELL AN INVESTMENT AT A LOSS. However, using a strategy of realizing losses to reduce taxable gains, referred to as tax loss harvesting, can help you enhance the after-tax returns of your portfolios. Tax loss harvesting can not only save an investor taxes in the current year, but if done properly, can provide tax savings for years to come. Many investors avoid tax loss harvesting because they want to avoid selling something at a loss and possibly missing a rebound. We advise our clients to maintain their equity exposure even while tax loss harvesting. You can do this by simultaneously selling your asset that has an unrealized loss and purchasing a similarly correlated asset to the one just sold.

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Third Quarter 2016 Market Review

Third Quarter 2016 Market Review

 

Capital Markets marked time and fluctuated largely sideways after posting sharp gains in the first month (July) of the 3rd Quarter.

Fixed Income
3qtr1

The 10-year US Treasury yield crept up to 1.6% after falling to 1.36% earlier in the quarter. The longer end of the curve remained less steep with the 30 Year note yielding just 2.32%. It began the quarter yielding 2.29%, so it hardly budged. Municipal bond prices moderately declined during the quarter but traded down less than -0.31%. Inflation Protected Treasuries advanced 1.42% and is now up 6.58% year to date. The US Aggregate bond advanced by .46% and ended the quarter with a 5.80% year to date gain. Comments from the Federal Open Markets Committee suggest a rate hike is in play by the end of year.  Read more

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order

Getting Your Fiscal House in Order

 

fiscal-houseBecause it is always a timely topic, we thought we would discuss household fiscal responsibility and try to provide readers with some tips for getting their fiscal house in order. As financial planners and CPA’s, we interact with people from all across the financial spectrum. Our experience has taught us that whether a household is in good financial condition or not has less to do with household income and more to do with household spending (Sound familiar, can you say federal government?). We see families who make more than $500,000 annually who can’t borrow a nickel because they are so maxed out with debt. We also see families who make $60,000 annually who have a house, two cars and no debt other than a mortgage. What it comes down to is simple math. You can’t spend more than you make indefinitely. You can do so in the short-term by borrowing to fund the difference, but at some point that option runs out. So, why do so many families find themselves in a financial mess? We believe there are three main reasons:

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